Recipe for a Purse

Recipe for a Purse

Our good friend and former employee of Sawyer Brook, Lois Gase, now living in sunny CA has been busy making handbags, and documented the process for us to share with you!

Start with the essential ingredients… and add a big dash of fun!
Ingredient: Fabric Ingredient: Handles
Parlour Mauke
(see alternate below) (available here)
Ingredient: Lining Ingredient: Snaps
Hummingbird Silk 4 prong snaps
(in rusty green) (available here)

The Ins & Outs of It!

Putting the recipe together…

Pattern:

Loes Hinse Butterfly Purse
#5402 (modified to be slightly smaller)

Fabric:

Shown in: Parlour
from Early Autumn Collection
rayon/cotton chenille from Anne Klein

Currently Available: Settee
from Winter Collection

purple/navy  $29.95

 


Overview: Step by step…

More details and tips below…

 

When cutting a purse pattern, work with a single layer so that you can plan around the dominant feature of the print.  Consider tracing additional pattern pieces to lay out the whole layer at once.

Tip: Mark the center with a pin so that you can check the pattern placement with your finger.

Consider using the reverse sides as facing pieces: the colors match exactly but give a different look.  (This could be done on this purse, though I chose the face side.)
Our sample uses both FormFlex fusible interfacing for the purse tops and sew-in hair canvas for the body.See a list of interfacings and supports below.
The pattern called for fabric loops to attach the handles. The chosen fabric was too bulky and difficult to turn fabric loops. Therefore we chose to use one layer of main fabric and one layer of lining.
We used magnetic snaps for a closure. Be sure your snap area has a double layer of interfacing positioned as you would behind button-holes.
The instructions called for dressmakers boning to be sewn into seam allowance along the top purse edge.  We cut the boning to proper length and use a strong (size 90) needle to stitch to seam allowances.

Interfacings and Supports

Form Flex – purse tops (all 4 pieces) and purse facings Hair Canvas – purse body SoftKnit fused to the lining to create a firmer, more durable lining
Whisper Weft fused to pocket to create firmness Dressmakers Boning – sewn into seam allowance for stability Handle: Mauke 

Snaps: 4 Prong


Details: Here are some other tips…

 

Pattern: Loes Hinse Butterfly Purse #5402 (modified to be slightly smaller)

50901 Parlour Richly woven 60% rayon/40% cotton chenille from Anne Klein boasts large clusters of wine and herb green florals supported by deep olive foliage on a roasted red ground.  The sheen from the rayon yarns adds glamour to this plush texture.  58″ (H/D) Note: No longer available in this color but the purple/navy color, Settee is in stock!

Lining: Hummingbird Iridescent Silk in Rusty Green–a rich lining fabrication that makes the inside as pretty as the outside!
(1) Working with a large print is easier by cutting single layer. When cutting purse pattern pieces plan out where you’d like the dominant feature of the print.  One option is to place the dominant feature the center of the front or back (or both).  Tip…..Place a pin in the floral center which can be felt with your finger, through the pattern piece to ensure you have placed the pattern in the appropriate position.Examine print – locate what part of the design should be placed at center of front and back pieces.  This does not always have to be the largest floral design; consider using other sections of the fabric design
(2) Consider tracing pattern pieces  to cut single layer (in this case one front & back; four purse tops; two facings.
(3) Consider using the reverse side as facing pieces – colors match exactly but gives another look (could be done on this purse although I went with the print).
(4) Our sample used both fusible interfacing (FormFlex) for the purse tops and hair canvas (non fusible) for purse body.
(5) Tip: Our purse called for fabric loops to attach the handles.  The chosen fabric was too bulky and difficult to turn fabric loops.  Therefore we chose to use one layer of main fabric and one layer of lining.  First sew a 1/4″ seam the length of the fabric strip (long enough to create all four loops).   Press and turn lining fabric right side out.  Next turn under to wrong side 3/8″ of outer fabric.  We used Steam-A-Seal2 to fuse this turned-in seam allowance firmly to
the wrong side.  Lastly, turn under the lining to wrong side, even with the exterior fabric.  Edgestitch each edge to secure the turned under seam allowances and define the edges.  When completed cut into 4 equal pieces to be used for purse handle (as shown in pix#4) 

 

magnetic snaps
Mauke Handles 

(6) Tip:  We used magnetic snaps for a closure.  Be sure your snap area has a double layer of interfacing positioned as you would behind buttonholes.  To mark placement for the snap we used the washer included with the snaps.  We positioned the washer at center and marked with chalk through the two rectangle holes right and left of center round opening.

We used our Buttonhole Cutter to cut slits for the snap legs to feed through to wrong side.  (Or use sharp nose scissors being careful not to make slits any larger than necessary.)  Insert the snap by pulling legs through the slits to wrong side; apply washer over legs and finally bend legs to the right and left securely.  In this photo you see the snap and washer as it looks prior to attaching to the purse. Below them is the snap as it appears after attaching to the purse.

(7) Tip:  In our purse the instructions called for dressmakers boning to be sew into seam allowance along the top purse edge.  This created a nice firm edge above the snap running between the fabric loops holding the purse handles.  We cut the boning to proper length and use a strong (size 90) needle to stitch to seam allowances.

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